Pyro Board: 2D Rubens Tube

"More fire is always better."  Oh, Danish scientist guy.  I think you might be my soulmate. (via Colossal)

The Weight of Mountains

This is a short film about the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed. It is based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp, and was shot in Iceland.

Physical geography and geology is an enormous and fascinating subject, and this film only touches upon the surface of the discipline.

Gorgeous.

Stanford Professor Andrei Linde celebrates physics breakthrough

Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo surprises Professor Andrei Linde with evidence that supports cosmic inflation theory. The discovery, made by Kuo and his colleagues at the BICEP2 experiment, represents the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the “first tremors of the Big Bang.”

"B-modes of gravitational waves have been detected in the cosmic microwave background radiation.” (via io9)

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab Explains Polar Vortex Behind U.S. Big Chill

X-ray photograph of tulips, colorized. (by Arie van’t Riet)

X-ray photograph of tulips, colorized. (by Arie van’t Riet)

From journalist Rose Eveleth and animator Igor Coric, find out how powerful your nose is and what’s going on inside of it in this excellent TED-Ed: How Do We Smell? (insteadofwatchingtv; via thekidshouldseethis)

One recent morning, inside a renovated camel barn, across town from the White House, and just past a refrigerator on which a form was posted, listing portions of bamboo and something called “Leaf Eater Food, Gorilla,” four adult humans sat with their gazes fixed on a bank of video screens on which absolutely nothing was happening. Everyone in the room was delighted. The images being transmitted were of two creatures in an enclosure in an adjoining room. One of them looked like a large, fuzzy soccer ball—its shape, proportions, and black and white markings were reminiscent of a MacGregor Classic Size 5. The other was the considerable bulk of a middle-aged female Ailuropoda melanoleuca, a giant panda, named Mei Xiang. Mei and the cub, which was born in late summer and is named Bao Bao, were both sound asleep. Except for the slightest flutter of fur rising and falling with their breath, they were absolutely motionless. The audio feed from the enclosure was more nothingness, just a low rushing whoosh made by air passing over a microphone. The observers were nevertheless transfixed as the pandas continued their deep, still sleep. Minutes ticked by. On the screen, one paw flicked, and then the animals resumed their pure repose. The hypnotic appeal kept everyone in the room almost as still and silent as the bears, all eyes on the screens. “Great morning,” one of the observers finally murmured. “Everything is just perfect.” (via Smithsonian Magazine)

One recent morning, inside a renovated camel barn, across town from the White House, and just past a refrigerator on which a form was posted, listing portions of bamboo and something called “Leaf Eater Food, Gorilla,” four adult humans sat with their gazes fixed on a bank of video screens on which absolutely nothing was happening. Everyone in the room was delighted. The images being transmitted were of two creatures in an enclosure in an adjoining room. One of them looked like a large, fuzzy soccer ball—its shape, proportions, and black and white markings were reminiscent of a MacGregor Classic Size 5. The other was the considerable bulk of a middle-aged female Ailuropoda melanoleuca, a giant panda, named Mei Xiang. Mei and the cub, which was born in late summer and is named Bao Bao, were both sound asleep. Except for the slightest flutter of fur rising and falling with their breath, they were absolutely motionless. The audio feed from the enclosure was more nothingness, just a low rushing whoosh made by air passing over a microphone. The observers were nevertheless transfixed as the pandas continued their deep, still sleep. Minutes ticked by. On the screen, one paw flicked, and then the animals resumed their pure repose. The hypnotic appeal kept everyone in the room almost as still and silent as the bears, all eyes on the screens. “Great morning,” one of the observers finally murmured. “Everything is just perfect.” (via Smithsonian Magazine)

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